When the United States of America was first founded, it was founded with the hope of a fuller life, a freer life, and a better life for all its citizens. In our nation’s founding documents, there are references to the concepts of liberty, the pursuit of happiness, justice, and tranquility. In fact, it is these very things that our forefathers dreamt of and sought to provide for all generations of Americans.

With such hope came a democratic system of ruling—one where the people had a say in who would represent them in all matters, devising a governing system run by the people and for the people. In essence, such a system would allow citizens to elect the individuals they believed best represented the nation as a whole, the individuals that represented the melting pot from which this country was built. Those individuals would then stand in for all citizens in matters of foreign diplomacy, defense, justice, order, and more.

Out of this larger group would emerge a leader—a president elected to enforce the laws drafted by the rest, to promote competent individuals to higher positions of power, to issue orders that embody the nation’s best interests. This president would not only be supported, but revered—a symbol of democracy and a symbol of the fuller, freer, and better life that all citizens deserve.

Thus, as we celebrate Presidents Day this year, let us remember that while the day itself regards specific presidents such as George Washington and Abraham Lincoln, it also represents something far greater. It represents freedom, it represents the ability to persist and to overcome, and it represents hope—which is what each and every one of us needs to continue on in our pursuit toward liberty, the pursuit of happiness, justice, and tranquility.

Please feel free to download our Pediatric Lesson “Presidents Day and Introduction to the Roles of the President” or our Adolescent Lesson “Presidents Day and Presidential Review” for your enjoyment.

“Liberty without learning is always in peril, and learning without liberty is always in vain. – John F. Kennedy”

Authored by Diana Dreher