Last week, we touched on the importance of mentorship—what mentorship is, as well as the ways that it can influence a young person’s life. We emphasized that its main purpose is to ensure that young people feel cared for, that they are not alone, and that they have worth (The National Mentoring Partnership). At Education, Inc., that impact is magnified ten-fold. However, to truly understand that, it becomes essential that you understand who we are as an organization.

Education, Inc. provides educational services to young people currently receiving treatment for terminal illnesses, mental illnesses, behavioral challenges, eating disorders, addictions, learning disabilities, and more. In short, our student-patients face obstacles that cast a shadow over their lives—obstacles that can make the world appear to be a daunting and unbearable place. For these young people, it is not just an asset to be mentored, but a necessity. Unfortunately, many of our students lack the vital support needed for the battle toward mental wellness and/or recovery, while others are in great need of extra support as they face hospitalization for terminal or life-threatening diseases.

Regardless of the particular situation, one commonality links all of our student-patients—the need for hope, the need for a helping hand, the need for a mentor.

That is where our teachers step in.

At Education, Inc., our teachers encourage our student-patients to dream again, they enable them to enjoy learning again, and they help them to trust again. They empower young people who are powerless to their circumstances, they step in where others have stepped out, and they help to lighten the heavy burdens of these youths as best they can. They don’t simply educate on language arts, science, history, and mathematics—they educate on what it takes to overcome. As a result, they aren’t just teachers—they are beacons of strength, trusted friends, and most importantly, mentors.

To learn more on the specific ways our teachers mentor, please visit our Facebook where each day over the next several days, we will be posting examples that our teachers have shared.

Authored by Diana Dreher